Motorists still reluctant to fully trust driverless cars

by Oct 8, 2019Blog, News

New research carried out by the AA has suggested that UK motorists aren’t yet fully confident in the concept of driverless cars.

The motoring association discovered that while lots of people did see the positives that driverless cars can bring, such as improved mobility for elderly and disabled people, there were still many that had issues when it comes to trusting autonomous vehicles.

The AA carried out a poll of 21,039 people that revealed that just under a quarter of people indicated that they would trust a vehicle to drive itself whilst they were in it.

The most common concern, felt by 87% of people, was over the possibility of situations coming up that were not anticipated by the software programmers who had developed the technology.

Not all technology was being dismissed though. Many dealers were ready to embrace a number of advancements with 59% wanting adaptive cruise control, and 58% wanting advanced automatic emergency braking.

 

“The car has been pretty much the same for 100 years, but the next decade will see more change than in the previous 50 years.

– Edmund King, AA President

Edmund King, the president at AA, warned that manufactures shouldn’t go ahead and make fully autonomous cars their main aim, without first consulting with drivers.

He said: “‘We shouldn’t underestimate the cultural importance of the car. We shouldn’t take a Luddite approach to new driverless car technology but must bring the consumers with us.

“Today, nearly two-thirds [63 per cent] would be lost without their car, more women [70 per cent] say they would be lost without their car than men [59 per cent] and two-thirds still actually enjoy driving.

“Even with the projected growth of ride-hailing, connected and driverless cars, almost half can never envisage a time when they might give up their car.

“The car has been pretty much the same for 100 years, but the next decade will see more change than in the previous 50 years.

“There is no doubt technological advances can and will save lives and enhance mobility for the elderly, disabled and the young. The jury is still out on when, or if, the consumer will embrace the driverless car in the way they have grown to love driving their cars.”

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